Does coaching pose a conundrum?


Looking at my research data about project managers' experience as coaches, it struck me...do I think coaching is often encouraged for others but not quite so readily for ourselves? It could be a childish view (parents will say to children to do things they may not do themselves)....but....

Could it be that the generally accepted view of coaching suggests a knowledge differential e.g. my tennis coach knows more about tennis than I do, or a power differential such as a manager coaching an employee. And we really like the freedom to 'do our own thing' (and possibly ignore things bothering us until a later date)?

The challenge with professional coaching is that it involves change; we are invited to be honest with ourselves and new recognition of something that is affecting our current situation invites the change.

When seeking coaching for personal reasons, there might be an assumption that the coach is 'putting themselves above us', or we might become embarrassed by what we have to say. Well maybe openness can lead to shame, but getting something out in the open might just be a temporary upset that helps us in the long run. (E.g. like going to the dentist/hygienist who highlights to us the quality of our teeth-cleaning and resets us back on track?)

However it also needs to be said that most professional coaches take coaching very seriously; they are sensitive to the coachee, maintain an ethical and confidential stance and adhere to the requestor's agenda, so you only talk about what is important and relevant to you. i.e. you decide what you want to explore and the professional supports you to explore from an independent and more objective viewpoint.



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